Firework Safety for Dogs

Firework Safety for Dogs

Independence Day is near, and many dogs have a fear of loud noises and find fireworks scary. June is firework safety month, and 4th of July is right around the corner. There are a lot of simple things you can do to assist your pet with their fear of fireworks and make celebrations as low stress as possible. Read on to discover tips from PetFX for how to calm dogs during fireworks, along with safety tips.
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Make sure to keep your dog indoors

Bringing your dog outside during fireworks might not be the best idea. Loud noises, sudden pops and flashes could easily startle your dog and cause them to bolt or run away.


Microchip and ID your dog

In the event that your dog does escape during fireworks, it is crucial to have proper identification tags with up-to-date contact information. We recommend microchipping as a backup for tags and collars which might come loose or get lost. Make sure your microchip information is updated as well! In the event that your dog does run away, having the proper identification will help them get returned safely. 

If your dog becomes lost during firework celebrations, make sure that you contact local animal control and surrounding shelters immediately. If you find a lost pet, return them to the address on their tag or bring them to a local animal shelter so they can be returned to their family.


Be safe!

Make sure that you practice fire safety and that everyone else is aware of best practices. Keep dogs away from fireworks, matches, open fires, or any other flammable items. Your dog may be curious and try to sniff, bite, or even eat fireworks and pet hair can easily catch fire or singe if they get too close. 

Make sure that when festivities are over, you survey your yard for remaining debris before letting your dog outdoors. 

 

Bringing pets outdoors

If you are planning on bringing your pet outside with you during festivities and fireworks, make sure you use a leash or carrier to keep them from running away. Running away is a common response to fear and could happen unexpectedly. Frightened dogs running loose, especially at night, are at high risk of getting lost or hit by a car. Be prepared to be there for your pet to prevent accidents from happening and to keep your pet safe.


Stay cool

If you plan on bringing your dog outside, keep in mind that it can get hot outside, and the celebrations can be distracting. Make sure that your dog has access to plenty of water and shade. 


Take pets outside before fireworks begin

Allowing your dog to use the bathroom before fireworks begin will help them feel more safe, relaxed, and comfortable. It may also reduce the chances of your pup having an accident during the fireworks or refusing to go because the fireworks are too loud.

 

BEFORE FIREWORKS BEGIN:

Although fireworks are enjoyable for humans, for some pets, fireworks cause a lot of stress which may include:

  • Shaking, trembling, or whining 
  • Barking, howling, or drooling
  • Trying to hide or escape from the house, yard, or enclosure 
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control or even diarrhea 

Walk your dogs beforehand or take them out before the fireworks begin. Taking them out first will ensure that you avoid taking them out while fireworks set off. 

Exercise your dog before the festivities. Tiring out your dog beforehand will reduce excess energy and wear them out so they can sleep through the noise. 

Move your dog to a safe area, preferably a room where they feel safe. Move your dog to this area before fireworks begin, and make sure they have toys or comfort items so that they aren't left alone. 

Close any windows and close curtains and blinds to attempt to muffle any sounds. Closing the curtains and blinds will also ensure that your pup isn't startled by any flashing lights. 

Put on music, the TV, or a white noise machine to drown out or mask any sounds.

Ignore the fireworks yourself and don’t make a big deal or call attention to them. Instead, play with a toy to see if your dog wants to join, but don’t force them to if they aren’t interested. 

Don’t punish or yell at your dog for behavior exhibited during fireworks. When they are scared, punishment may actually increase their fear. 

Reward your dog with CannaLove CBD Soft Chews, CannaHearts, or Anxiety Relief Shampoo before the fireworks begin.

Giving your dog calming products such as CBD Soft Chews or CannaHearts before fireworks begin may help dogs that exhibit nervousness or respond to environmentally induced stress. It may also promote a sense of relaxation and mental alertness without drowsiness. 

CannaLove CBD Soft Chew Health Supplements provide the naturally occurring complex of cannabinoids found in broad-spectrum hemp, which may provide your dog with the entourage effect required to support proper cannabinoid intake. These supplements are formulated and developed to support your dog experiencing occasional unwanted stress and anxiety. 

CannaLove CBD CannaHearts deliver 2.5 mg. of CBD from broad-spectrum hemp (containing less than 0.3% THC) and will not affect your dog psychologically. Adding a CBD supplement to your dog’s firework and celebration routine may help to maintain your dog’s comfort.

Emotional and environmental stress can cause your dog to become anxious and agitated. Bathing your dog with Anxiety Relief Shampoo prior to fireworks beginning may also reduce this stress with the calming effects of aromatherapy. 

Long term, your goal should be to make your dog feel safe and secure and eventually not have such a fear of fireworks or other loud noises. Taking the above precautionary measures will help to mitigate the fear and anxiety, but you will want to introduce these practices before the firework season begins. As always, if the condition worsens or you fear your pup has developed a phobia, make sure you consult your vet about the next steps to take. 

We hope these pet safety tips can help you and your dog have a more enjoyable and safe experience during firework celebrations.

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